Allard Jongman

Professor
Chair, Linguistics Department
Primary office:
785-864-2384
422 Blake Hall

As a phonetician, I am interested in the study of speech. My research program investigates units and levels of representation in terms of speech perception and speech production. I use detailed acoustic and perceptual analyses of the speech signal to understand the complex interaction between phonetic, phonological, and lexical information. Acoustic analyses identify cues that uniquely characterize classes of speech sounds. Perceptual experiments investigate the roles these cues play in speech perception. These production and perception experiments seek converging evidence from cross-linguistic data (e.g., Dutch, English, German, Greek, Korean, Malayalam, Mandarin). My research also addresses related questions of language learning: what is the nature of the phonetic representations in learning a second language, and how are these representations affected by one's native language categories? Such issues also enable me to investigate the contribution of language-specific versus more general auditory mechanisms in perception. Born and raised in The Netherlands, I found out about linguistics through our high school counselor. I had a knack for picking up languages but did not want to end up as a high school language teacher, primarily because I feared having a menace like myself in the classroom. She suggested linguistics; it sounded interesting but it was offered as a post- B.A. major. I enrolled at the University of Amsterdam in Slavic Languages and switched to Linguistics after obtaining my B.A. degree. I became interested in aphasia and developmental language disorders and wrote an M.A. thesis on auditory figure-ground discrimination in children with Minimal Brain Damage. In the process, I became interested in phonetics. Since at the University of Amsterdam, as at many other European universities, Linguistics and Phonetics were completely separate departments, I had never had a formal course in Phonetics. When I decided to pursue my Ph.D. in the U.S., Brown University was the ideal choice since it allowed me to postpone the choice between aphasia and phonetics since Brown had experts in both. Working with Profs. Sheila Blumstein and Phil Lieberman, I quickly gravitated towards Phonetics. After my Ph.D., I worked as a postdoc with Prof. Jim Miller at Central Institute for the Deaf. This position was rudely interrupted by INS: since I had originally come to Brown on a Fulbright Fellowship, I had to go home to The Netherlands for two years. In the mean time I had married Joan Sereno, we met on our first day in graduate school and realized we had more in common than just Linguistics. The fact that I was married to a US citizen did not deter INS and Joan and I fortunately landed positions at the Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in Nijmegen, The Netherlands. A few years later, we moved back to the US as postdocs at UCLA, working with Profs. Pat Keating and Peter Ladefoged. This lasted only a short time as I was offered a tenuretrack position at Cornell University 4 months after arriving in Los Angeles. While I got tenure at Cornell, we ultimately decided to leave since the academic climate was spoilt by politics and our department was eventually abolished. And thats when we moved to the University of Kansas.

Education

  • B.A., Slavic languages and literature, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 1980.
  • M.A., Linguistics, University of Amsterdam, The Netherlands, 1982.
  • M.A., Linguistics, Brown University, 1985.
  • Ph.D., Linguistics, Brown University, 1986 (dissertation: "Naturalness in Phonetics: A Study of Context-Dependency").

Research Interests

  • Acoustic phonetics: mapping between acoustic properties and linguistic features across languages.
  • Speech perception and auditory word recognition.
  • Phonetics of second language learning.
  • Experimental psycholinguistics.

Professional Appointments

  • Postdoctoral Research Scientist, Central Institute for the Deaf, September 1986-January 1989.
  • Scientific Staff Member, Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics, February 1988- February 1991.
  • NIH Postdoctoral Research Fellow, Department of Linguistics, UCLA, February 1991- August 1991
  • Assistant Professor of Linguistics, Cornell University, July 1991-97.
  • Associate Professor of Linguistics, Cornell University, July 1997-December 1999.
  • Assistant Professor of Linguistics, The University of Kansas, August 1999- July 2001.
  • Associate Professor of Linguistics, The University of Kansas, August 2001- 2005.
  • Professor of Linguistics, The University of Kansas, August 2005-present.
  • Chair, Linguistics, The University of Kansas, 2007-present.

Research Grants

  • KU GRF Award (co-P.I. with M. Rice), 2003. ( "Neuroimaging in the Center for Biobehavioral Neurosciences in Communication Disorders.")
  • NSF grant, 2005-2009. (“Acoustic and perceptual correlates of emphasis in Arabic”).
  • KU GRF Award, 2002-2003. ("Improving the perception of foreign-accented speech.")
  • KU RDF Award (co-P.I. with T. Schreiber, A. Agah, F. Brown, J. Gauch, J. Sereno, and S. Speer), 2000. (“Kansas University Cognitive Robotics Group Proposal”).
  • KU RDF Award (co-P.I. with M. Rice, R. Atchley, and J. Sereno), 2000. (“Evaluation of the perceptual and neurological processing abilities of children with grammatical limitations”).
  • NIH FIRST Award, 1995-2001. ("Acoustic and perceptual properties of English fricatives").
  • NSF ILI grant (co-P.I. with B. Lust and J. Lantolf), 1995-97. ("Interdisciplinary approaches to the scientific study of language knowledge and acquisition: Cornell University Cognitive Studies").
  • Society for the Humanities Research Grant, 1993.

U.S. Patent

Speech processing apparatus and methods for processing burst-friction sounds. U.S. Patent #4,809,332, February, 1989 (with J.D. Miller).

Articles and Manuscripts

Lieberman, P., Katz, W., Jongman, A., Zimmerman, R. and Miller, M. (1985a). Measures of the sentence intonation of read and spontaneous speech in American English. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 77, 649-657. Abstract

Lieberman, P., Katz, W., Jongman, A., Zimmerman, R. and Miller, M. (1985b). Reply to Bruno H.Repp.Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 78, 1116-1117.

Jongman, A., Blumstein, S.E. and Lahiri, A. (1985). Acoustic properties for dental and alveolar stop consonants: A cross-language study. Journal of Phonetics, 13, 235-251. Abstract

Shinn, P.C., Blumstein, S.E. and Jongman, A. (1985). Limitations of context-conditioned effects on the perception of [b] and [w]. Perception and Psychophysics, 38, 397-407. Abstract

Jongman, A. (1989). Duration of frication noise required for identification of English fricatives. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 85, 1718-1725. Abstract

Jongman, A., Fourakis, M., and Sereno, J.A. (1989). The acoustic vowel space of Modern Greek and German. Language and Speech, 32, 221-248. Abstract

Jongman, A. (1990) Book review of "Linguistic structure in language processing," Greg N. Carlson and Michael K. Tanenhaus (Eds.). Linguistics, 28, 1076-1079.

Sereno, J.A., and Jongman, A. (1990). Phonological and form class relations in the lexicon. Journal of Psycholinguistic Research, 19, 387-404. Abstract

Jongman, A., and Lahiri, A. (1990). Guest editors of the Yearbook of Morphology, Vol.3. Dordrecht: Foris.

Lahiri, A., and Jongman, A. (1990). Intermediate level of analysis: features or segments. Journal of Phonetics, 18, 435-443. Abstract

Jongman, A. (1990). Impersonal passive in Relational Grammar: Demotion or advancement? Linguistische Berichte, 129, 349-386. Abstract

Lahiri, A., Jongman, A., and Sereno, J.A. (1990). Dutch pronominal clitics: A theoretical and experimental approach. In A. Jongman and A. Lahiri (eds.),Yearbook of Morphology, Vol. 3, 115-127. Dordrecht: Foris.

Jongman, A., and Miller, J.D. (1991). Method for the location of burst-onset spectra in the Auditory-Perceptual Space: A study of place of articulation in voiceless stop consonants. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 89, 867-873. Abstract

Jongman, A., and Sereno, J.A. (1991). On vowel quantity and post-vocalic consonant duration in Dutch. Proceedings of the XIIth International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, Vol. 2, 294-297.

Jongman, A., Sereno, J.A., Raaijmakers, M., and Lahiri, A. (1992). The phonological representation of [voice] in speech perception. Language and Speech, 35, 137-152. Abstract

Sereno, J.A. and Jongman, A. (1992). Phonetic priming effects in auditory word recognition. In A. Bradlow (ed.), Working Papers of the Cornell Phonetics Laboratory, Vol. 7.

Jongman, A. (1994). The segment as smallest prosodic unit: A curious hypothesis. In: P. Keating (ed.), Phonological structure and phonetic form: Papers in Laboratory Phonology III, 99-107. Cambridge University Press.

Sereno, J.A., and Jongman, A. (1995). Acoustic correlates of grammatical class.Language and Speech, 38, 57-76. Abstract

Jongman, A. (1995). Book review of "Acoustics of American English Speech" by J.P Olive, A. Greenwood, and J. Coleman. Language and Speech, 38, 115-118.

Jongman, A., and Sereno, J.A. (1995). Acoustic properties of non-sibilant fricatives.Proceedings of the XIIIth International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, 432- 435.

Kim, H., and Jongman, A. (1996). Acoustic and perceptual evidence for complete neutralization of manner of articulation in Korean. Journal of Phonetics, 24, 295-312. Abstract

Sereno, J.A., and Jongman, A. (1997). Processing of English Inflectional Morphology. Memory & Cognition, 25, 425-437. Abstract

Moore, C.B., and Jongman, A. (1997). Speaker normalization in the perception of Mandarin Chinese tones. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 102, 1864-1877. Abstract

Jongman, A. (1998). Are locus equations sufficient or necessary for obstruent perception? Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 21, 271-272.

Jongman, A., Sereno, J., Wayland, R., and Wong, S. (1998). Acoustic properties of English fricatives. In P. Kuhl and L. Crum (eds.), Joint Proceedings of thew 16th International Congress on Acoustics and the 135th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, 2935-2936.

Wang, Y, Jongman, A., and Sereno, J. (1998). Training American listeners to perceive Mandarin tones: A first report. In P. Kuhl and L. Crum (eds.), Joint Proceedings of the 16th International Congress on Acoustics and the 135th Meeting of the Acoustical Society of America, 2979-2980.

Jongman, A. (1998). Effects of vowel length and syllable structure on segment duration in Dutch. Journal of Phonetics, 26, 207-222. Abstract

Wang, Y, Jongman, A., and Sereno, J. (1998). Training American listeners to perceive Mandarin tones. In N. Adisasmito-Smith, W. Ham, and L. Lavoie (eds.),Working Papers of the Cornell Phonetics Laboratory, vol. 12.

Wang, Y., Spence, M., Jongman, A., and Sereno, J. (1999). Training American listeners to perceive Mandarin tones. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 106 (6), 3649-3658. Abstract

Sereno, J.A., Zwitserlood, P., and Jongman, A. (1999). Entries and operations: The great divide and the pitfalls of form frequency. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 22, 1039. Abstract

Doeleman, T.L, Sereno, J.A., Jongman, A., and Sereno S.C. (2000). Features and feedback. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 23, 328-329. Abstract

Jongman, A., Wayland, R., and Wong, S. (2000). Acoustic characteristics of English fricatives. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 108, 1252-1263. Abstract 

Jongman, A., and Moore, C. (2000). The role of language experience in speaker and rate normalization processes. Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Spoken Language Processing, I, 62-65. Paper/Abstract

Jongman, A., Wang, Y., and Sereno, J. (2000). Acoustic and perceptual properties of English fricatives. Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Spoken Language Processing, I, 536-539. Paper/Abstract

Wang, Y., Sereno, J., Jongman, A., and Hirsch, J. (2000). Cortical reorganization associated with the acquisition of Mandarin tones by American learners: An fMRI study. Proceedings of the International Conference on Spoken Language Processing, II, 511-514. Paper/Abstract

Smits, R., Sereno, J.A., and Jongman, A. (2000). Categorization of sounds.Abstracts of the 41st Annual Meeting of the Psychonomic Society, Vol. 5, 53.

Wang, Y., Jongman, A., and Sereno, J. (2001). Dichotic perception of Mandarin tones by Chinese and American listeners. Brain and Language, 78, 332-348.(pdf)

Warner, N., Jongman, A., Cutler, A., and Muecke, D. (2001). The phonological status of Dutch epenthetic schwa. Phonology, 18 387-420. (pdf)

Wayland, R., and Jongman, A. (2001). Chanthaburi Khmer vowels: Phonetic and phonemic analyses. Mon-Khmer Studies, 31, 65-82.

Warner, N., Jongman, A., Cutler, A., and Muecke, D. (2001). The phonological status of schwa insertion in Dutch: An articulograph study. Proceedings of the 4th International Speech Motor Conference.

Jongman, A. (2001). Categorization of English fricatives. In R. Smits, J. Kingston, T.M. Nearey, and R. Zondervan (eds.) Proceedings of the Workshop on Speech Recognition as Pattern Classification, 19-23.

Wayland, R., and Jongman, A. (2002). Registrogenesis in Khmer: A phonetic account. Mon-Khmer Studies, 32.

Wade, T., Eakin, D., Webb, R., Agah, A., Brown, F., Jongman, A., Gauch, J., Schreiber, T. and Sereno, J. (2002). Modeling recognition of speech sounds with Minerva2. Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Spoken Language Processing, 1653-1656. (pdf)

Wayland, R., and Jongman, A. (2003). Acoustic correlates of breathy and clear vowels: the case of Khmer. Journal of Phonetics, 31, 181-201. (pdf)

Wang, Y., Sereno, J., Jongman, A., and Hirsch, J. (2003). fMRI evidence for cortical modification during language learning. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 15, 1019-1027. (pdf)

Jongman, A., Wang, Y., and Kim, B. (2003). Contributions of sentential and facial information to perception of fricatives. Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research, 46, 1367-1377. (pdf)

Wang, Y., Jongman, A., and Sereno, J. (2003). Acoustic and perceptual evaluation of Mandarin tone production before and after perceptual training. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 113, 1033-1044. (pdf)

Jongman, A., Wade, T., and Sereno, J. (2003). On improving the perception of foreign-accented speech. In M.J. Sole, D. Recasens, and J. Romero (eds.) Proceedings of the 15th International Congress of Phonetic Sciences, pp. 1561-1564. (pdf)

Warner, N., Jongman, A., Sereno, J., and Kemper, R. (2004). Incomplete neutralization of sub-phonemic durational differences in production and perception of Dutch. Journal of Phonetics, 32, 251-276 (pdf)

Wang, Y., Behne, D., Jongman, A., and Sereno, J. (2004). The role of linguistic experience in the hemispheric processing of lexical tone. Applied Psycholinguistics, 26, 449-466. (pdf)

Jongman, A. (2004). Phonological and phonetic representations: The case of neutralization. In Agwuele, A., W. Warren, and S-H. Park (Eds.), Proceedings of the 2003 Texas Linguistics Society Conference, 9-16. Somerville : Cascadilla Press. (pdf)

Al-Masri, M., and Jongman, A. (2004). Acoustic correlates of emphasis in Jordanian Arabic: Preliminary results. In Agwuele, A., W. Warren, and S-H. Park (Eds.),Proceedings of the 2003 Texas Linguistics Society Conference, 96-106. Somerville : Cascadilla Press. (pdf)

Jongman, A. (2005). Acoustic Phonetics. In Philipp Strazny (ed.), Encyclopedia of Linguistics, New York: Routledge.

Jongman, A. (2005). Speech Perception. In Philipp Strazny (ed.), Encyclopedia of Linguistics, New York: Routledge.

Smits, R., Sereno, J., and Jongman, A. (2006). Categorization of sounds. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 32, 733-754. (pdf)

Warner, N., Good, E., Jongman, A., and Sereno, J. (2006). Orthographic vs. morphological incomplete neutralization effects. Journal of Phonetics, 34, 285-293.(pdf)

Wang, Y., Jongman, A., and Sereno, J. (2006). Second language acquisition and processing of Mandarin tone. In Li, P., Tan, L.H., Bates, E., and Tzeng, O.J.L. (Eds.), Handbook of East Asian Psycholinguistics (Vol. 1: Chinese). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Jongman, A., Wang, Y., Moore, C. and Sereno, J. (2006). Perception and production of Mandarin tone. In Li, P., Tan, L.H., Bates, E., and Tzeng, O.J.L. (Eds.), Handbook of East Asian Psycholinguistics (Vol. 1: Chinese). Cambridge, UK: Cambridge University Press.

Atchley, R.A., Rice, M., Betz, S., Kwasny, K., Sereno, J., and Jongman, A. (2006). A comparison of semantic and syntactic Event Related Potentials generated by children and adults. Brain & Language, 99, 236-246.

Jongman, A., and Wade, T. (2007). Acoustic variability and perceptual learning: The case of non-native accented speech. O-.S. Bohn and M. Munro (Eds.),Language Experience in Second Language Speech Learning. Amsterdam: John Benjamins.

Wade, T., Jongman, A., and Sereno, J. (2007). Effects of acoustic variability in the perceptual learning of non-native-accented speech sounds. Phonetica, 64,122-144. (pdf)

Maniwa, K., Jongman, A., and Wade, T. (2008). Perception of clear English fricatives by normal-hearing and simulated hearing-impaired listeners. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 123, 1114-1125. (pdf)

Maniwa, K., Jongman, A., and Wade, T. (2009). Acoustic characteristics of clear spoken English fricatives. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 125, 3962-3973. (pdf)

Dmitrieva, O., Jongman, A., and Sereno, J. (2010). Phonological neutralization by native and non-native speakers: The case of Russian final devoicing. Journal of Phonetics, 38, 483-492. (pdf)

Herd, W., Jongman, A., and Sereno, J. (2010). An acoustic and perceptual analysis of /t/ and /d/ flaps in American English. Journal of Phonetics, 38, 504-516. (pdf)

Jongman, A., Herd, W., Al-Masri, M., Sereno, J., and Combest, S. (2011). Acoustics and perception of emphasis in Urban Jordanian Arabic. Journal of Phonetics, 39, 85-95. (pdf)

McMurray, B., and Jongman, A. (2011). What information is necessary for speech categorization? Harnessing variability in the speech signal by integrating cues computed relative to expectations. Psychological Review 118, 219-246. (pdf)

Rhone, A., and Jongman, A. (2012). Modified locus equations categorize stop place in a perceptually realistic time frame. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America131, EL 487-491.(pdf)

Lee, H., and Jongman, A. (2012). Effects of tone on the three-way laryngeal distinction in Korean: An acoustic and aerodynamic comparison of the Seoul and South Kyungsang dialects. Journal of the International Phonetic Association 42, 145-169. (pdf)

Jongman, A. (2013). Acoustic Phonetics. Oxford Bibliographies in Linguistics. Edited by M. Aronoff. New York: Oxford University Press,2013-03-19. URL: http://www.oxfordbibliographies.com/view/document/obo-9780199772810/obo-9780199772810-0047.xml?rskey=8kNg37&result=42&q=

Lee, H., Politzer-Ahles, S., and Jongman, A. (2013). Speakers of tonal and non-tonal Korean dialects use different cue weightings in the perception of the three-way laryngeal stop contrast. Journal of Phonetics 41, 117-132.

Liu, J., and Jongman, A. (2013). American learners’ acquisition of L2 Chinese affricates /ts/ and /tsh/. Proceedings of Meetings on Acoustics 18,060005 (10pages). http://dx.doi.org/10.1121/1.4798223

Herd, W., Jongman, A., and Sereno, J. (2013). Perceptual and production training of intervocalic /d, 'flap', r/ in American English learners of Spanish. Journal of the Acoustical Society of America 133, 4247-4255.

Vitevitch, M., Sereno, J., Jongman, A., and Goldstein, R. (2013). Speaker sex influences processing of grammatical gender. PLoS ONE, DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0079701

Apfelbaum, K.S., Bullock-Rest, N., Rhone, A.E., Jongman, A., and McMurray, B. (2014). Contingent categorisation in speech perception. Language, Cognition and Neuroscience 29, 1070-1082.

Lee, G., and Jongman, A. (to appear). Perceptual cues in Korean fricatives. Festschrift for Harvey Sussman. Equinox Publishing.

Herd, W., Sereno, J., and Jongman, A. (to appear). Cross-modal priming differences between native and nonnative Spanish speakers. Studies in Hispanic and Lussaphone Linguistics.

Book: Phonetics: Transcription, Production, Acoustics, and Perception

Phonetics book coverReetz, H., and Jongman, A. (2009). Phonetics: Transcription, Production, Acoustics and Perception. Wiley-Blackwell. Providing a comprehensive overview of the four primary areas of phonetics, Phonetics: Transcription, Production, Acoustics, and Perception is an ideal guide to the complete study of speech and sound.


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